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Kessler Elementary School update

A message to Kessler families:

Dear Parents and Families,

Earlier this week the school district was notified of an issue at Kessler Elementary. The incident occurred on Monday at recess between a para-educator and a student.

After being notified, a school district administrator immediately talked with the employee and a parent of the child. Based on the initial discussions, the district employee has been placed on administrative leave while an investigation is being conducted.

The district expects to complete the investigation sometime next week and is working in cooperation with local law enforcement on the issue.

The safety and security of our students and staff members is a top priority.

Respectfully,

 

Dr. Dan Zorn, Superintendent

Longview Public Schools

2019-12-03T07:37:52-08:00November 27th, 2019|

A message for Kessler Elementary families

A message for Kessler Elementary families:

Dear Parents and Families,

This email is a safety and security update for Kessler families.

The City of Longview has declared a severe weather event for tonight. This First Christian Church, which is across the street from Kessler Elementary, announced they will be operating a homeless shelter tonight through Saturday morning.

The district has contracted with Columbia Security to patrol the grounds around Kessler Elementary in the afternoon from 2:45pm until 5:45pm, then again in the morning from 6:45am until 8:45am, to assure the safety of our students. We are in close contact with Longview Police, and have asked them to increase their presence in the area. Also, the district is working with the ministerial association, who is managing the severe weather shelter, to understand how best to keep our students and staff safe. The church has set up a phone number for residents to report any incidents which may occur. The number is 360-749-8056 extension 123.

The safety of our students and staff members is our top priority. If you have any questions please give me a call.

Respectfully,

 

Noma Hudson, Principal

Kessler Elementary School

Phone: (360) 575-7580

2019-11-27T13:46:05-08:00November 20th, 2019|

RAL students help Women’s Shelter

RA Long High School National Honor Society school officers and club advisor

RA Long High School National Honor Society school officers and club Advisor

National Honor Society (NHS) is a service club that serves both the school and the community. Parent/Teacher Conferences, Student-Led Conferences, Open House, various assemblies, “Hall of Fame”, and many graduation events are just a few events they help with.

Each year they also do a “Collection Drive” for the community. In the past they have collected for the local area food, shoes, socks, coats and even soccer shoes for an orphanage in Thailand. This year it was brought to their attention that the Women’s Shelter could use toiletries, they stepped up to the challenge and the students brought in more than 450 items.

NHS is a nationally recognized club that is governed by specific membership qualifications and is by invite only.  A student must have a 3.5 GPA (maintain a 3.3 accum.), be of high scholarship, leadership, and character and be involved in school and community service.

Pictured from left to right: Faliha Amjad, President, Keely Morgan, Vice-President, Madison Pittman, Secretary, Ada Beasley, Treasurer, Brady Anderson, Historian, Jayleen Baker, RAL Teacher & NHS Advisor.

2019-11-27T13:48:40-08:00November 18th, 2019|

RA Long students read at Olympic Elementary

High school students from R.A. Long visited Olympic Elementary school today to help first graders with reading and to promote literacy. Eighteen high school students visited an Olympic first grade classroom and were partnered up with a younger student to read books together. The high school students read a book to the younger student first, then they switched roles and the younger students read.

Bringing excitement and fun to reading helps create and grow interest in books. For the high school students, learning and experiencing giving back to the community, and what it means to be a role model. is an important lesson.

A great day had by all.

 

2019-10-23T15:44:23-07:00October 23rd, 2019|

Teacher Spotlight – Mrs. Julian, Cascade Middle School

Where were you born?  I was born in Longview.

Have you lived here your whole life?  With exception of going to college and living two years in Virginia when my husband was finishing his service in the Navy.

Where did you go to school?  I went to school at Butler Acres Elementary, Coweeman Middle School and Kelso High School, class of 1983.

Mrs. Dawn Julian

Did you know what you wanted to be in high school? In high school, I wanted to be a biologist. I loved biology and I loved math.

Did you enjoy high school? I loved it, I absolutely loved it! I am a very social being and got along with all students.

Were you in clubs or sports?  I was a swimmer, which was my passion. I was also in Pep Club and Spanish Club. I chose not to be a cheerleader because I was in the pool year round.

What events did you participate in for the swim team? I swam the breaststroke. I was a freestyler, but I was distance, so it was 500 meters.

Do you still swim? No, because it affects my hair. I do work out with teachers at Cascade, we do aerobics and then I lift weights with my husband twice a week.

How did you decide to attend Central Washington University? I was on bike ride with my friend since kindergarten and he was going to go to Central. It was early August and my plan was to go to LCC. We were riding out in Lexington and he said you really should think about going to Central. I think it would be a good fit for you instead of going to LCC. If you go to LCC, I think you will probably end up just staying in town.

Did his comments strike you as being odd? Yes, that struck me as odd because I was always very driven. I did really well in school and I went home and told my parents that I wanted to go to Central – they said okay.

When did you decide to pursue teaching? I was in a calculus class and I couldn’t get it. I didn’t care about the shadow of a tree. I loved writing, humanity classes, history and such. My roommate in college was my best friend since 7th grade, and she was an elementary education major.

At that point, did you want to be a teacher? I thought, oh, no way! I would never want to teach those elementary kids. I went to my advisor and she said, “You are really good with numbers, so why don’t you explore accounting or business classes.”  I did Business Administration with an Accounting emphasis.

What did you do after college? After college, Mike and I were married and moved to Virginia. Mike was in the Navy for 8 years.

What did you do after moving back to the area? I was working 6-7 days a week at Nelson Ball Paper Products (now it is called Newark). I decided to quit my job and go to school to get my master’s degree full-time to be a teacher.

After earning a Master’s degree, where did you start working? I student taught at Wallace Elementary in a 5/6 multi-age classroom because I wanted to teach at a school that was as close to inner city. I like to go down the road with speed bumps in life. I love the speed bumps because that is what gives you, in my opinion, character.

How did you end up at Cascade Middle School? I went to every elementary and middle school in Longview and Kelso and interviewed with the principals. I knew I wanted to be at Cascade Middle School, I just knew it. I was in a behavior classroom, and Bruce Holway and I walked into this room and it was kind of chaos and a boy picked up a piece of paper and threw it at me and I thought, “This is heaven!”

Do you enjoy working with different students? Yes, I believe one of my jobs as a middle school teacher is to take these “wild mustangs”, wrangle them in, but not break their spirit. I love challenges; the naughty kids are the ones that are so challenging. I love all of the kids; I love the challenge of trying to meet the needs of every single kid in the classroom.

When did you start teaching? Twenty-five years ago, in 1995.

Have you had some good mentors? Yes, I have been very fortunate that I learned from the best.  Marilyn Melville, Adele Marshall, Bruce Holway, the list goes on and on.

How long did you teach English and Math?  Bruce Holway would ask me to teach 8th grade and then 6th grade. I was very fluid. I have been a coach for 5 years, but last year I went back into the classroom.

Why did you go back to the classroom? What I found was that I grew so much last year as an educator because I added things to my box. I had also saw and observed things that I could say, “Yes, I do that!” and it really rekindled my love of instruction.

What did you teach last year?  For the first time I taught an elective; it was called Cavalier Pride. I was never allowed to teach an elective.

So how did you get the chance to teach an elective? Last year Mr. Rugg had an opening and I said, “I would really like to teach an elective” He said, “I would really like you to teach Language Arts and Social Studies because you are really good at it.” I said, “Can I have just have one?”  So, I taught two reading interventions.

What makes for a good teacher?  You have to like whatever grade level you are teaching, that is first and foremost. Secondly, even as a veteran, you need to be open and coachable. As a teacher, it is your responsibility to share your skills with experienced teachers and the newbies. My mentor teacher Dave Woods, I am the teacher I am today because of him and Marylyn Melville, Katherine Smith, Myrna Raff and all of those names.

Is there an art or science to teaching? Some say there is not an art of teaching, but a science. I think there is an art and a science and the art piece has to be present. I can deliver the best lesson all day, but it’s about the relationship and rapport with those kids, and gaining trust.

What is the best part of being a teacher?  When they come back to you and say, “Mrs. Julian, I loved having you as a teacher.” I was lucky to have all of the sixth graders and they come back and they want a hug, they tell you that they love you.

What is the worst part of being a teacher?  When the kids leave you, especially when they go to high school because you may not see much of them anymore. It is bittersweet. The other worst part is when you hear they one of them have lost their life. That just gets you.

What would you tell people who do not have kids in school what school is like today? I have been in all of the schools as a district coach and the staff, including the paras, the custodians, the bus drivers, the teachers, the principals that we really do have the student in mind, which is first and foremost. I want them to know we are giving it our all.

What would you tell a brand new teacher?  It is hard work but it is so rewarding – stick with it. It takes about four years to figure it out. Your first year you don’t know what you don’t know. Your second and third year you are starting to think you do, but by the fourth year, you will know what you don’t know. Seek out those experienced teachers.

What do you do on your own time? I love to be outdoors, whether that is hiking or camping, we just bought a trailer so that is something new. I love to listen to music, go to concerts and plays, the arts. I love to spend time with my family. I am very fortunate that I have 20-year-old twins, one is at LCC, one is at Washington State, and they are successful. Then of course, when I am at the theatre pub. I enjoy that.

Do you spend a lot of time at the theatre pub? Not like we used to. We have a nice crew of people, so we are very fortunate. It is getting less and less after 22 years.

To the people that read this what would want them to leave with? That I am a passionate hard working educator. It is all about the kids. Bottom line. When I put my head on the pillow at night, I need to know that I have given 100% and that I take my job seriously.

What haven’t I asked you that I should have? That I like to cook. I am pescotarian.

What is a pescatorian? I eat things low on the food chain. I will eat fish, eggs, and some dairy. I won’t eat chicken, beef or pork.

Is this because you are allergic to these things, or you wanted certain health benefits?  I did it then for animal reasons and then later it became more health, I don’t like the taste of meat.

What dairy do you do? I will do cottage cheese. It has to be organic; it doesn’t mean it is any better for you. I gave up milk maybe two years ago.

Do you eat eggs?  Only if they are happy eggs. If they are free range, and if I can get them from someone who raises their own chickens.

Do you eat fish? Yes, wild caught.

Do you eat many vegetables? I do eat a lot of vegetables and whole grains. I try to get protein from chickpeas and some kinds of legumes.

2019-11-01T14:48:21-07:00October 22nd, 2019|

Monticello Middle School – A Successful Summer!

Monticello Middle School hosted another successful round of summer school. Incoming 6-8th grade students attended regular middle school classes like math, reading, science (robotics), as well as a new advisory class called Character Strong (teachers are piloting this curriculum for next year).

The robotics program clearly engaged the students who became invested in the daily challenges of crafting and coding using LEGO Mindstorms during this 2-week program. Building and programming codes for their own bot designs, students taught their bots to use a wide range of sensors.  Airblock and Blue Heron Force drones and Makey Makey (an inventor’s tool kit) were also part of the curriculum.

In the reading class, students read about Lewis Hine and how his work impacted child labor regulations.  Students focused on vocabulary and making inferences based on sound evidence.  While in math, iReady lessons were utilized as well as student-crafted games.

Overall, the roughly 40 students who attended Monticello’s summer school classes learned new skills, demonstrated creativity, and were fully engaged throughout the program.

Monticello Middle School summer classes

Monticello Middle School summer 2019

 

2019-06-28T13:43:46-07:00June 28th, 2019|

Great Grad – Jewell Barnes, Mark Morris HS

Have you attended Mark Morris all four years? Yes, I have.

Can you tell me a little about getting through high school? My experience has been very positive. Every single year I have taken rigorous courses to challenge myself academically.

How would you characterize your high school experience? A huge theme of my high school career is the personal growth I have made by becoming a more social communicator. So working on social and communication skills, and leadership skills.

Can we talk about the social skills?  Yes, a little story that is personal to me is that as a young child in elementary and middle school I was very reserved, I was shy, and sometimes talking to adults made me so nervous that I would shake. I knew that to be successful in life I had to overcome those challenges, so I challenged myself in high school by putting myself in situations that allowed me to communicate with my peers as well as adults.

How did you overcome your social challenges? The first thing I did my freshman year was run for student government. I put myself out there and was elected Freshman Class President.

What did you learn being class president? Mark Morris is filled with kids from all around the community. I found that working in class office, there are skills that I do not have yet, so I decided to join the leadership class at Mark Morris my sophomore year to gain those skills.

What did you do in the leadership program? In the leadership program, we work a lot on project planning and management as well as looking at social and emotional education. In other words, how can we evaluate people’s needs throughout the school so we can appropriately help them? That has been a big influence on my career goals as well as my education.

How would you explain your personal growth during high school? Very positive personal growth – rewarding. I feel like I have become more mature and aware of who I am as a person individually and as well as how I relate to other people in my life.

What does being a Mark Morris graduate mean to you?  For me, being a Mark Morris graduate signifies  perseverance because graduating is not an easy thing. The different things we are required to do is difficult in itself, but we all have our personal stories and challenges.

What would you like people to remember about you? I would like people to remember that I always tried to be there, I always tried to show up and work hard. Pushing myself and challenging myself and in that way it shows examples to other students to do the same.

Do you have a better feel for who you are after four years of high school? Oh, absolutely. One thing I realized during my high school experience is my story is diverse in that I can connect both with other people, and those I have similarities with.

When you say your story is diverse, what do you mean?  I am the first generation college student in my family. It is very exciting! I grew up in a family where just my mom raised me. I grew up with my three older sisters. My family went through a huge loss during my sister’s high school years. Also, I am adopted.

What are some of your best high school memories? The first thing that pops in my head is going to leadership camps. I went to two throughout my junior and senior year. My eyes were open to a whole different cultural world – it was nothing I expected. I value that experience greatly.

What are your future plans? In the Fall I will be attending the University of Washington in Seattle. I am thinking about getting a degree in psychology. Psychology touches so many different fields, but I am looking into counseling now.

How did you choose UW?  I choose the University of Washington for its reputation for having really good academics and I was interested in the diversity of the student population.

Are you going to work during college?  Yes, I do plan on working while I am in college. College is expensive. I have multiple scholarships, from both the university and many local scholarships that I am very grateful for. I do plan to work through college, not just for the money, but for the experience as well.

You seem to be a very experience driven individual – why is that? I see life as a learning experience, every day I am learning. There are going to be people who have other experiences that I have never experienced and just connecting with those people is special. I feel like people and the connections we have enriches life.

What is your grade point average (GPA)?  I have a 3.994 grade average. I got one A- in the first semester of calculus.

What are some of the lighter moments of your high school career? I know I am not a super comedic person, I know a lot funny people. If anything I am more of a serious person, which is how most people would describe me. The more funny people that I meet or just more expressive or compassionate, I feel that not everyone can be enthusiastic or funny, there needs to be the audience members in the performance. Some of the quote unquote friends I’ve met are Mariah Door and Anna Sanchez Matias. Those two people stand out as people who are positive and they are always making others laugh, including myself.

How would describe yourself?  Thoughtful and light-hearted, I use a lot of self-deprecating humor. When I try to be funny, I am only 4 feet 10 inches tall, so I talk about how short I am and how feisty I am – because I am not very feisty at all.

Do you think the Mark Morris class of 2019 is great? I believe so. What I have seen at Mark Morris, students are willing to do the hard work. A lot of them are driven and passionate about what they do and I think they will do great things.

2019-06-21T13:09:03-07:00June 21st, 2019|

Free Environmental Science Summer Camp

Dates: July 8 – 12, 2019 from 8 am to 3 pm each day. The camp is hosted at R. A. Long High School, 2903 Nichols Blvd. Longview, WA 98632.

This is a free event sponsored by NASA. Open to all high school students (including incoming freshmen and recently graduated seniors) in the Cowlitz County school districts. Applicants who have never had an opportunity like this, including students from low-income families and those who will be the first in their family to attend college, are encouraged to apply. Download the registration form and email scanned copies to Mrs. Burleson or take pictures of each page and send them to 360-431-5487.

View camp information here.

Download registration form here.

2019-07-12T07:56:10-07:00June 12th, 2019|

Summer Meal Program information

Summer Meals for Kids!

This year the Summer Food Service Program will offer free nutritious meals to all neighborhood children ages 18 years and younger at:

Northlake Elementary, 2210 Olympia Way,  June 17 – August 16, Breakfast 8:30 am – 8:45 am,  Lunch 12:00 pm – 12:15 pm  *No Meals July 1- July 5

Kessler Elementary, 1902 Kessler Blvd., June 17 – July 3, Breakfast 8:30 am – 9:00 am, Lunch 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm,  July 8 – August 16 Breakfast 8:30 am – 8:45 am, Lunch 12:00 pm – 12:15 pm

Olympic Elementary, 1324 30th Ave., June 17 – June 28, Breakfast 8:30 am – 8:45 am, Lunch 12:00 pm – 12:15 pm

Monticello Middle School, 1225 28th Ave., July 8 – July 26, Breakfast 8:30 am – 8:45 am, Lunch 12:00 pm – 12:15 pm

Archie Anderson Park, 22nd Ave & Alabama St., July 8 – Aug 16, Lunch 12:00 pm  – 12:15 pm, Snack 3:30 pm – 3:45 pm  *Monday thru Thursday

Teen Center, 2121 Kessler Blvd., June 17 – Aug 16, Snack 3:30 pm – 3:45 pm  *No Meals July 4- July 5

All meals will meet the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, so you know your child will be eating a healthy meal. Supervised activities will be offered at Northlake and Kessler Elementary Schools, Monticello Middle School, Teen Center, & Archie Anderson Park. For more information, contact City of Longview, Parks & Recreation Department at 360-442-5400. For more information about the program, or to volunteer to help, call the Longview Public School Nutrition office at 360-575-7172.

The Summer Food Service Program is sponsored by The U.S. Department of Agriculture

2019-06-12T11:37:18-07:00June 12th, 2019|