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Longview School District Meal Service Locations and Times

The school district meal service program is helping serve kids in need during this challenging time. Please see some recent changes to the meal program below.

*During the Stay Home, Stay Healthy order, Longview Public Schools will continue providing meal service for anyone under 18 years old* Meal service will continue during spring break, as well.

Please note, as of Friday, March 20, a new meal distribution location has been added in the parking lot behind Community House on Broadway. Also, starting Monday, March 23, meals will no longer be served at Roy Morse park due to low turnout. Those receiving meals at Roy Morse park have been redirected to other convenient locations.

Longview Public School Meal Service Locations and Times:
Meal Offering: Grab n’ Go breakfast and lunch served on weekdays to any person 0 to 18 years of age.

Static Sites
Meal Service 12:00pm -12:30pm, Monday through Friday

  1. St. Helens Elementary – Main Office Entrance
  2. Kessler Elementary – Main Office Entrance
  3. Monticello Middle School – Main Office Entrance
  4. Northlake Elementary – Main Office Entrance
  5. Columbia Heights Elementary – Main Office Entrance
  6. Mint Valley Elementary – Main Office Entrance

Mobile Delivery Sites
Meal Service 11:45am to 12:00pm, Monday through Friday

  1. Baker’s Corner Store parking lot – 5601 Ocean Beach Hwy, Longview
  2. Archie Anderson Park – 22nd Ave & Alabama St, Longview

Meal Service 12:15pm to 12:30pm, Monday through Friday

  1. Youth and Family Link parking lot – 907 Douglas St, Longview
  2. Community House on Broadway = 1335 11th Avenue, Longview (in parking lot behind building by Evangel Christian Fellowship)

Children must be present to receive meals.

Other Resources for Families 

Food Resource Calendar
Community Resources

2020-03-31T14:41:16-07:00March 31st, 2020|

Chromebook Distribution

Dear Parents and Families,

Thank you for your great interest in the continued education of your children during the statewide school closure.

At today’s Chromebook distribution, the demand was much higher than we anticipated. On Monday, March 30 we will again distribute Chromebooks at the same locations and times (noon-12:30pm) to meet the demand we experienced today.

Due to the high demand, we will only be able to check out one Chromebook per family. This will allow more families to stay connected to learning during the school closure.  We also want to remind you that any computer that is able to access the internet is also able to access the learning resources available on our website.  A Chromebook is not required for this access. We appreciate your understanding and patience.

Keep checking the district web site, Facebook page, and your email for updates. And, should you be checking out a Chromebook on Monday, remember to maintain social distancing. Stay healthy.

Thank you.

2020-03-30T13:54:14-07:00March 27th, 2020|

COVID-19 3-24-2020

PRESS RELEASE – PR009

March 24, 2020 at 1900 hrs.

Governor Inslee announced on March 23, 2020 proclamation #20-25: “Stay Home – Stay Healthy Order”. The order is effective throughout Washington State and prohibits all people in Washington State from leaving their homes or participating in social, spiritual and recreational gatherings of any kind regardless of the number of participants, and all non-essential businesses in Washington State from conducting business. This order is to take effect midnight on March 25, 2020. All non-essential businesses in Washington State shall cease operations, except for performing basic minimum operations. All essential businesses are encouraged to remain open and maintain operations, but must establish and implement social distancing. This is a critical intervention effort, on our part, to help notify our citizens to keep them safe in order to reduce harm from the spread of COVID-19 in our communities.

What does this mean to Cowlitz County residents? Washington citizens should not leave their homes except for essential activities. Some examples of essential activities are: caring for elderly, minors, persons with disabilities or others who are vulnerable. You can seek medical care, pick up medication, make needed purchases of supplies to work from home, or get food for your family. Some of the types of essential businesses that will remain open are: grocery stores, gas stations, health care facilities, pharmacies, restaurants for pick up or take-out meals, banks or supply stores. There are no checkpoint planned to ensure compliance.

Health care professionals and first responders are providing essential services. Essential state and local government functions are open in limited capacities. Utility services are continuing to provide garbage, water, sewer and electricity services. These providers will continue to work with citizens to maintain services and assist with payment options.

While this situation poses some unknowns, be assured that all essential food and supplies will continue across our roadways, that people will be able to travel to get essential needs like food and medical help, and that there are no current needs or plans to close our borders with other states. It bears repeating— there is no need to overstock on groceries and supplies. Be a good neighbor— remember that if we all shop as we normally would, there is plenty for everyone.

There is currently no plan to require businesses to register or apply for any permits, however businesses need to demonstrate their “essential” status in order to remain open. The federal government identifies Critical (Essential) Infrastructures Sectors at https://www.cisa.gov/critical-infrastructure-sectors. The sectors include: Energy, Chemical, Commercial Facilities, Communications, Critical Manufacturing, Dams, Energy Services, Financial Services, Food and Agriculture, Government Facilities, Health Care/Public Health, Information Technologies, Nuclear Reactors/Materials/Waste, Defense Industrial Base, Transportation Systems, and Water/Waste Water/Utilities.

It is recommended for these businesses to provide their employees with a signed letter (on letterhead) that states their employment status and the essential function of the business. Business issued ID cards would also be helpful for employees to have in their possession, though not required. Employees of essential businesses can still go to work. Every effort should be made to maintain social distancing of 6’ at work. If you have concerns about a business staying open in conflict with the Governor’s “Stay Home – Stay Healthy” Order you can visit www.co.cowlitz.wa.us to fill out a form or call 1-888-230-4970 for more information.

Law enforcement’s primary role is to help educate people about how to comply with orders to not gather together, to stay at home, and other restrictions. Law enforcement is not being asked to detain, arrest, ticket or establish checkpoints for compliance. The “Stay at Home” order is like other laws in that they work because people agree with the rationale and see it as a legitimate and sensible way to keep people safe. Our communities have shown they understand the severity of the situation and are doing all they can already to keep themselves, their families and neighbors safe and healthy.

The Cowlitz Association of Sheriff and Police Chiefs (CASPC) fully supports this mission and is committed to ensuring the safety of its communities.

Stay home if you can. Use common sense. Think how your actions can put others at risk. We want to encourage you to keep yourself and your loved ones safe and healthy by staying home. Don’t forget to check on elderly family members and neighbors— just adhere to social distancing. You can still go outside and run, walk, hike or ride your bike as long as you are maintaining the required social distancing of 6’ from individuals. You can walk your dog, walk alone or with someone you live with or even another person as long as they maintain necessary space. Parks in Cowlitz County will remain open to allow residents open spaces to enjoy the outdoors, fresh air, and sunshine. Play structures at parks will be closed.

Remember to only “Spread the Facts” and to “Stay Home -Stay Healthy”.

For general Cowlitz County COVID-19 Information you can call 1-888-683-8676. For questions please email imt.pio@co.cowlitz.wa.us.

2020-03-25T14:55:40-07:00March 25th, 2020|

COVID-19 3-20-2020

March 20, 2020

Dear Parents and Families,

I hope that you and your families are doing well during this very difficult and unprecedented time.  School has been closed for a week now and we want to provide you with an update on what the district is working on.

The district’s meal distribution program launched Monday and is serving about 350-400 kids per day. Each day, kids can visit one of the six schools providing meals or one of our four mobile delivery sites. Each child that participates is provided a grab and go breakfast and lunch.  As time progresses, we anticipate that the need for lunches may increase so we are preparing for that likelihood.

On Wednesday, the district launched our “Learning Resources” web page that provides information and web links to English, Math, Science, Social Studies and History lessons for our students. Though participation is optional, we urge you to take advantage of these ongoing learning opportunities for your students.  The resources provided will be updated periodically as we identify other quality resources that will be of value to our students during the school closure.

For parents of our youngest learners, reading aloud to your child is an incredibly valuable activity for you to engage in.  For all of our students, it is very helpful to provide as many reading opportunities as you can.  Encouraging your child to write about a variety of things is also quite helpful.  Keeping a journal of the experiences of the day is an excellent strategy that can help maintain the reading and writing skills your child has already acquired.

We have received some inquiries about the fulfillment of Governor Inslee’s request that school districts address the childcare needs of First Responders and Medical Professionals.  Longview Schools has partnered with Educational Service District 112 (ESD 112) and Childcare Aware to support families of First Responders and Medical Professionals seeking childcare options.  Visit Childcare Aware at bit.ly/CCAWAOnlineLookup or call the Family Center at 1-800-446-1114 to search for available child care centers during the mandatory school closures due to Covid-19. You will receive an updated list of open child care programs in our area that can meet your child care needs.

We continue to be in close contact with state and local officials and will send out periodic updates as things change.

Please keep checking the district web site at longviewschools.com for updated meal distribution schedules, learning resources and other information related to the school closure.  Thank you for your support, patience, and understanding.

Respectfully,

Dan Zorn, Superintendent

Longview Public Schools

2020-03-25T10:12:32-07:00March 25th, 2020|

School Counseling Resources

Dear Longview Families:

During the school closure, our district wants to provide access to school counseling and behavioral health resources. Please access the links below for resources that are specific to your child’s needs.  We will be updating this information regularly as additional resources are identified to share with you. Click on the link for each category below to access the resources.

Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Disasters and Other Traumatic Events: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/helping-children-and-adolescents-cope-with-disasters-and-other-traumatic-events/index.shtml#pub5
A publication from the National Institute of Mental Health to serve as a resource to parents/guardians, rescue workers and the community.

Talking to Kids About the Coronavirus: https://childmind.org/article/talking-to-kids-about-the-coronavirus/
This is a resource from the Child Mind Institute to help families talk with children who are stressed about the Coronavirus.  In addition to this article, there are additional resources for families at this site.

Talking with Kids about the News:https://www.pbs.org/parents/talkingwithkids/news/
This is a resource from Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) that has numerous resources supporting children with emotions and self-awareness to help children distress about the Coronavirus that can be accessed by grade level as well as information from parents and experts on how to establish new home routines when schools are closed.  Resources are available in English and Spanish.

How Teenagers can Protect Their Mental Health During the Coronavirus: https://www.unicef.org/coronavirus/how-teenagers-can-protect-their-mental-health-during-coronavirus-covid-19
This is an article produced by Unicef that provides six strategies for teens facing a new (temporary) normal.

Character Treehttps://charactertree.com/
Kindergarten and 1st grade free resources (including videos)to learn character skills with a “Mr. Rogers” feel.

Centervention: https://www.centervention.com/
Interactive games for K-Middle school reviewing important social emotional skills including Zoo Academy (K and 1) Zoo U (2nd and 3rd), SS Grin (3rd-5th) and Hall of Heroes (5th-7th grade) great messages and skills to work on as a family!

Virginia Career View: https://www.vaview.vt.edu/
Career exploration games and activities for researching career paths at all grade levels.

O-Net Online: https://www.onetonline.org/
A tool for career exploration with detailed description of the world of work.  Best for 9th – 12th grade students.

Career One Stop: https://www.careeronestop.org/ExploreCareers/Learn/career-profiles.aspx
In depth information about 900 different occupations (best for 8th – 12th grade).

Career Bridge: http://www.careerbridge.wa.gov/Survey_Cluster.aspx
A Washington State Career exploration, college, and training options website.

4-Year Public Colleges in WA state: http://www.wsac.wa.gov/college-admissions

2-year Community or Technical Colleges in WA state: https://www.sbctc.edu/our-colleges/search-college-programs/default.aspx

4-Year and 2-Year Colleges (Out of state/Private) College Board’s Big Future: https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/

Peterson’s College Information Guide: https://www.petersons.com/college-search.aspx#/sweeps-modal

Apprenticeship Programs:  http://www.lni.wa.gov/tradeslicensing/apprenticeship/

Apprenticeship Program of Study: http://www.k12.wa.us/careerteched/pubdocs/ProgramsofStudyandApprenticeshipAlignmentGrid.pdf

Military Training:  http://todaysmilitary.com/

Community Behavioral Health Support 

Resources

If there is a life-threatening emergency, please call 911. Crisis Response Services provides a cohesive response system 24 hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week, serving people of all ages and cultures who are experiencing a crisis.

http://www.linkingcowlitzcounty.org

Website containing the resources (medical, dental, housing, and many more) available in our community for students, parents and families.

Please contact 2-1-1 Info for comprehensive information and referral focused on health and social services. By Phone: simply dial 2-1-1 from any phone.

If you have a current Provider One ID Card and are going to a covered medical service within your community, you may be eligible for Medical Transportation.  Phone lines are open Monday – Friday from 8am – 5pm excluding the lunch hour and holidays. Please call at least 7-14 days in advance. Cowlitz County: 1–800-752-9422, Option 2.

Providers

Intake phone:  360.423.0203   720 14th Avenue, Second Floor, Longview, WA

Columbia Wellness has caring professionals who can assist with any difficulty that individuals or families may be experiencing. Staff are professionally trained, highly skilled, and eager to serve. This organization has provided quality service to this community since 1953.  Most insurance plans accepted.

Intake phone:  360-200-5419   748 14th Ave, Longview, WA

CORE Health’s mission is to provide comprehensive, integrated behavioral health services that promote the health and quality of life of our community members. They strive to create and maintain an environment that is warm and welcoming, values diversity and difference, provides safety, and promotes whole health by supporting individual’s and family’s along their recovery journey. Medicaid insurance accepted.

Intake phone: 360-353-9422   922 Fir St, Longview

The goal of the Cowlitz Indian Tribal Health Clinic is to provide a Holistic Approach to Health Care that promotes Disease Prevention, Treatment, and Education. Services include individual Counseling, Crisis Counseling, Grief Counseling, Psychological Evaluations, Medication Management, Youth Services, and Positive Indian Parenting Classes.  Any enrolled American Indian / Alaskan Native (AI/AN) of a Federally Recognized Tribe is eligible for services. Most insurance plans accepted.

Intake phone: 360-577-7442    309 Oak St, Kelso, WA

A First Place’s dedicated and caring staff provide co-occurring behavioral health services in a professional and friendly atmosphere. Our facility offers several different treatment options that work best for your student and your family.  Call us for more details on how we can help. Most insurance plans accepted.

Intake phone:  360-414-8600 945 – 11th Avenue, Suite B, Longview

Northwest Psychological Resources offers a wide range of mental health services provided by caring professionals with the highest qualifications. Each clinician is independent and sets his or her own fees without restriction or regulation by Northwest Psychological Resources. Most insurance plans accepted.

Intake phone:  360-414-2222      600 Broadway, First Floor, Longview

Peace Health Medical Group has a comprehensive system of care that serves children, adolescents, adults and seniors struggling with issues of chemical dependency and/or emotional distress. Our providers are experienced medical doctors, advance registered nurse practitioners, psychologists and social workers. Most insurance plans accepted, but not Medicaid.

Intake phone: 360-261-7020 1710 Allen Street, Kelso WA

Our providers use multidisciplinary practices to develop and maintain individualized treatment goals for each client. Our well-trained professional team consists of mental health therapists, chemical dependency counselors, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioners and psychiatrists. Patients are encouraged to have their families and members of their social support system participate in treatment. We specialize in providing culturally competent services, and our staff members have received intense training on evidence-based practices to ensure that we provide the best tools to help our patients lead healthy lives. Medicaid insurance accepted.

2020-03-23T12:03:51-07:00March 23rd, 2020|

Grade Level Standards 6-8

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 6th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Sixth Grade

The Arts – Move with a partner or group; explore and apply elements of music; understand playwriting conventions; use aesthetic criteria.

Computer Science Create a computational tool to collect data from their peers regarding the percentage of time technology is used for school work and entertainment.

Educational Technology – Use spreadsheet software to display poll or survey data.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Compare and contrast authors’ perspectives and write arguments to support claims using reason and relevant evidence.

Financial Education – Explain how debit cards differ from credit cards.

Health and Physical Education – Assess physical education status and set reasonable health-related goals, understand peer pressure and how to be a positive role model.

Math – Learn the concepts of ratios and rates, and compute with fractions and decimals to solve multi-step word problems.

Science – Learn about engineering, develop models, and examine feedbacks between systems.

Social Studies– Explore the Earth and its peoples through the study of ancient world history, geography, politics, culture, and economic systems.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well- rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 7th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Seventh Grade

The Arts – Create dances using choreographic devices; make musical choices based on ability; compare genres and styles of theatre; respond to art.

Computer Science – Refine computational models for predicting the likely color of the next pick from a bag of colored candy based on the data they have generated.

Educational Technology – Create a virtual tour of Washington to show demographic trends during the past 100 years.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Identify the central idea of a text, produce clear and coherent writing in various styles, share research presentations.

Financial Education – Predict how education and training can affect lifetime income.

Health and Physical Education – Develop competence in modified games, rhythmic and recreational activities, refine critical-thinking skills to avoid unsafe situations.

Math – Learn about proportional relationships and solve multi-step problems involving positive and negative numbers, fractions, and decimals.

Science – Learn about engineering, develop models, and examine feedbacks between systems.

Social Studies – Investigate both world and Washington state history with concepts and ideas in civics, economics, and geography.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well- rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 8th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Eighth Grade

The Arts – Create dances using choreographic devices; make musical choices based on ability; compare genres and styles of theatre; respond to art.

Computer Science – Discuss issues of bias and accessibility in the design of existing technologies.

Educational Technology – Use online global newspapers to compare point of view or bias of the same event.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Compare and contrast the structures of two or more texts; develop writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.

Financial Education – Assess the relationship between education and training and lifetime income.

Health and Physical Education – Set goals, track progress, and participate in activities to improve physical education; understand the origins and causes of diseases.

Math – Use linear equations to represent, analyze, and solve problems and analyze functions using representations such as tables, graphs, or equations.

Science – Learn about engineering, develop models, and examine feedbacks between systems.

Social Studies – Investigate the ideas, issues and events from the framing of the Constitution through Reconstruction and Industrialization.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well- rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.
2020-03-23T08:49:12-07:00March 20th, 2020|

Grade Level Standards 9-12

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 9th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Ninth Grade

The Arts – Refine performance skills; perform, compose, and analyze music; write one- act scripts; become visually literate thinker and creator. Design and document tools and methods for collaboration on a project to increase connectivity of people in different cultures and career fields.

Computer Science – Design and document tools and methods for collaboration on a project to increase connectivity of people in different cultures and career fields.

Educational Technology – Identify and analyze websites with opposing points of view.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Analyze complex characters and how an author’s ideas are developed; used technology to produce writing projects.

Financial Education – Develop a system for keeping and using financial records. Investigate checking, savings, and credit card accounts that financial institutions provide.

Health and Physical Education– Develop a personal health/physical education plan and health-literacy skills that will continue through adulthood.

Math– High schools students typically take algebra I, geometry, and algebra II. They model real-world phenomena, compare simple and complex functions, and learn about congruence, similarity and symmetry through geometric transformations.

Science– Analyze major global challenges and possible solutions; develop and use models; plan and conduct investigations; analyze data.

Social Studies– Explore major developments that have shaped the modern world, including human rights, revolution, democracy, and economics.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well- rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 10th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Tenth Grade

The Arts – Refine performance skills; perform, compose, and analyze music; write one- act scripts; become visually literate thinker and creator. Illustrate ways computing systems implement logic, input, and output through hardware components.

Computer Science – Illustrate ways computing systems implement logic, input, and output through hardware components.

Educational Technology – Identify and analyze websites with opposing points of view.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Analyze complex characters and how an author’s ideas are developed; used technology to produce writing projects.

Financial Education – Explore job and career options. Identify how non-income factors such as child-care options, cost of living, and work conditions can influence job choice.

Health and Physical Education – Develop a personal health/physical education plan and health-literacy skills that will continue through adulthood.

Math – High schools students typically take algebra I, geometry, and algebra II. They model real-world phenomena, compare simple and complex functions, and learn about congruence, similarity and symmetry through geometric transformations.

Science – Analyze major global challenges and possible solutions; develop and use models; plan and conduct investigations; analyze data.

Social Studies – Explore major developments that have shaped the modern world, including human rights, revolution, democracy, and economics.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well- rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.
Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 11th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Eleventh Grade

The Arts – Understand how dance relates to culture; make musical choices; apply theatre-related knowledge; develop an artistic style. Create prototypes that use algorithms to solve computational problems by leveraging prior student knowledge and personal interests.

Computer Science – Create prototypes that use algorithms to solve computational problems by leveraging prior student knowledge and personal interests.

Educational Technology – Participate in an online simulation that investigates a current global concern.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Evaluate and draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Financial Education – Identify ways that a negative credit report can affect a consumer’s options, creditworthiness and the cost of credit.

Health and Physical Education – Develop a personal health/physical education plan and health-literacy skills that will continue through adulthood.

Math – High schools students typically take algebra I, geometry, and algebra II. They model real-world phenomena, compare simple and complex functions, and learn about congruence, similarity and symmetry through geometric transformations.

Science – Analyze major global challenges and possible solutions; develop and use models; plan and conduct investigations; analyze data.

Social Studies – Investigate the politics, economics, geography, and history of the United States from a variety of perspectives.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well- rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals
The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 12th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Twelfth Grade

The Arts– Understand how dance relates to culture; make musical choices; apply theatre-related knowledge; develop an artistic style. Systematically design and develop programs for broad audiences by incorporating feedback from users.

Computer Science- Systematically design and develop programs for broad audiences by incorporating feedback from users.

Educational Technology– Participate in an online simulation that investigates a current global concern.

English Language Arts (ELA)– Evaluate and draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Financial Education – Analyze factors that affect net income. Revise IRS form W-4 to determine the optimal amount to withhold for personal income tax.

Health and Physical Education– Develop a personal health/physical education plan and health-literacy skills that will continue through adulthood.

Math– High school students typically take algebra I, geometry, and algebra II. They model real-world phenomena, compare simple and complex functions, and learn about congruence, similarity and symmetry through geometric transformations.

Science– Analyze major global challenges and possible solutions; develop and use models; plan and conduct investigations; analyze data.

Social Studies– Investigate the politics, economics, geography, and history of the United States from a variety of perspectives.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well- rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals
The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.
2020-03-23T08:49:51-07:00March 20th, 2020|

Grade Level Standards 3-5

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 3rd grade.

Key Learning Goals for Third Grade

The Arts – Create movement sequences; explore a variety of musical genres; participate in storytelling; use a variety of art styles and techniques.

Computer Science – Model and describe the life cycle of a plant and the relationships that cause impact.

Educational Technology – Use presentation software to present original stories about classroom topics.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Read different kinds of texts at grade level; compare and contrast ideas among texts; plan, revise, and edit writing.

Financial Education – Calculate the total cost of a purchase that includes multiple items priced in whole dollar amounts.

Health and Physical Education – Show mature locomotor and manipulative skills; combine skills for complex movement; work cooperatively with others.

Math – Learn about fractions; add, subtract, multiply and divide numbers through 100.

Science – Organize and use data to describe weather; learn about forces, magnetic interactions, and organisms in relation to the environment.

Social Studies – Investigate the varied backgrounds and perspectives of people living in Washington and North America, including American Indians.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well-rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.
Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 4th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Fourth Grade

The Arts – Use the principles of choreography; perform music; understand how dialogue is used in scripts; create and explain artwork.

Computer Science – Compare and refine possible solutions to a complex community problem.

Educational Technology – Compare characteristics of native people from several regions of Washington using selected websites.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Read and discuss a variety of literary and nonfiction texts; analyze ideas, select topics, and elaborate while writing.

Financial Education – Predict the consequences of spending decisions.

Health and Physical Education – Set goals for healthy habits and social skills; understand consequences of behaviors.

Math – Develop an understanding of equivalent fractions and addition and subtraction of fractions.

Science – Explore wave patterns; analyze and interpret data from maps; learn how external features support plants and animals.

Social Studies – Explore Washington’s past and present, including geography, economy, and government today; examine local, regional, and state-wide issues and events, analyzing them from multiple perspectives.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well-rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

Washington has K–12 learning standards that define the knowledge and skills every student needs to be prepared for post-secondary pathways, careers, and civic engagement when they complete high school. Below are brief examples of Washington’s key learning goals for 5th grade.

Key Learning Goals for Fifth Grade

The Arts – Use multiple elements of dance; perform a variety of music; analyze a performance; present and reflect about artwork.

Computer Science – Develop possible solutions for an identified classroom problem through collaborating with others and testing the solution.

Educational Technology – Identify and investigate a global issue and generate possible solutions by sharing ideas with students from another school.

English Language Arts (ELA) – Read grade-level texts and conduct short research projects that pull information from several texts on the same topic.

Financial Education – Predict how influences such as current fashion trends, peer pressure, and procrastination can affect financial decisions.

Health and Physical Education – Set personal goals based on results from physical education assessments and develop responsible personal and social behavior to improve healthy habits.

Math – Work with decimals up to the hundredths place and add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions.

Science – Describe the movement of matter and energy and how they change; graph data to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

Social Studies – Explore the development of the United States from pre- Colonial times to 1791, with regard to civics, economics and geography.

Washington also has learning standards in Integrated Environment and Sustainability, World Languages, Career and Technical Education (frameworks and industry standards for middle and high school), English Language Proficiency (in ELA, math, and science), as well as guidelines for HIV & Sexual Health and Early Learning (birth–3rd grade) that complement a well-rounded education for all students.

Special education: Students who receive services have accommodations, modifications, and supports identified in their individual education plans.

English learners: Students who are learning to speak English have language proficiency standards that help teachers plan instruction across subjects that is appropriate to each student’s level of language development.

Washington State Learning Goals

The Washington State Legislature has established four learning goals to provide the foundation for the development of all academic learning standards in the state:

  1. Read with comprehension, write effectively, and communicate successfully in a variety of ways and settings and with a variety of audiences;
  2. Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history, including different cultures and participation in representative government; geography; the arts; and health and fitness;
  3. Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate technology literacy and fluency as well as different experiences and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and
  4. Understand the importance of work and finance and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.
2020-03-23T08:50:26-07:00March 20th, 2020|